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Store-A-Tooth™ Dental Stem Cell Banking and Product News

Provia Laboratories™ Brings on New Stem Cell and Biobank Business Development Executive

Posted by Ryan LeClair on Mon, Sep 14, 2015 @ 10:00 AM

Provia Laboratories, a leader in stem cell processing and biobanking, appoints Timothy Beals as its new Senior Director, Business Development. Provia seeks to leverage its cGMP laboratory capabilities and biobank facility into new research opportunities, expanded stem cell processing and commercial biobanking services, as well as further international expansion.

Timothy Beals, Senior Director, Business Development Provia LaboratoriesLittleton, MA (September 14, 2015): Provia Laboratories announced today that Timothy Beals joined Provia as the Senior Director, Business Development. Provia, who offers Store-A-Tooth™, a service to preserve the stem cells from healthy extracted teeth, recently completed a multi-million dollar investment in launching a new cGMP stem cell processing laboratory and storage facility in Littleton, MA. Combined with the reputation Store-A-Tooth developed as the leader in dental stem cell banking, Provia is poised to leverage their expertise and new cGMP facility to pursue biomedical research, cell processing beyond dental stem cells, commercial bio-banking services, and international expansion.

Beals’ career spans over a period of 30 years as a regional, national and international cryopreservation specialist, and a seasoned executive focused on developing, launching and managing stem cell companies and bio-banks worldwide. He has been involved in cord blood, dental, synovial, adipose and amniotic fluid stem cell processing and banking for both clinical and research applications. With a strong understanding of the emerging and maturing needs of the clinical and research stem cell industry, Beals will lead Provia Laboratories efforts in developing additional opportunities and strategic growth.

“We are very fortunate to have Tim join our management team,” said Howard Greenman, CEO of Provia Laboratories. “I’ve known Tim for over a decade, his experience, reputation, network, commitment and insight are exactly what Provia needs to grow and advance our role in this rapidly growing field.”

“I recall over 10 years ago when the Provia team contacted me to discuss needs relating to cryopreservation of stem cells from teeth,” Beals added. “At that time it was not commonly heard of, but the Provia team became early pioneers, and developed the opportunity into a rapidly growing business for Store-A-Tooth. It has been exciting to witness their growth, success and recognition in this field. This is an exciting time and opportunity for all of us here at Provia Laboratories.”

The proper collection, transport, processing, testing and preservation of stem cells is a crucial and significant part of the regenerative medicine value chain. Companies have provided stem cell banking services from bone marrow, and umbilical cord blood for over two decades. More recent discoveries in the past 10 years identified additional sources of valuable stem cells derived from dental pulp, adipose and other sources. Tissues that have commonly been discarded as biological waste contain valuable tissue forming stem cells called mesenchymal stem cells, and have shown to generate growth and repair of bone, cartilage, tendon, nerve and heart tissue. Thousands of patients have been treated with stem cells and well over a million families have privately preserved stem cells for their families’ own future use. 

About Provia Laboratories, LLC

Provia Laboratories, LLC (http://www.provialabs.com) is a healthcare company headquartered in Littleton, MA which specializes in high-quality biobanking. Provia offers a variety of products and services for use in complex biobanking environments to improve sample logistics, security, and quality. The company advises industrial, academic, and governmental clients on matters related to the preservation of biological specimens for research and clinical use. Provia’s core business, Store-A-Tooth (http://www.store-a-tooth.com) is a private stem cell bank with nearly 1000 collection sites serving clients from around the world.

Tags: Company Updates

Simply Smiles Miami in Pinecrest, FL has partnered with Store-A-Tooth

Posted by Ryan LeClair on Wed, Sep 09, 2015 @ 10:55 AM

Store-A-ToothTM is proud to announce Dr. Alexander Trujillo and Dr. Kiara Miro-Trujillo as our newest dental partners in Miami, Florida

Simply Smiles Miami

As our dental partners, Dr. Alexander Trujillo and Dr. Kira Miro-Trujillo will work with Provia Labs, providers of the Store-A-Tooth private stem cell banking service, to educate patients who request to learn more about banking their dental stem cells.

A growing body of medical research is focused on the use of stem cells to heal tissue damaged through injury, disease, aging or congenital defect. 

Since the discovery of stem cells in dental pulp, patients losing teeth, either baby teeth or extracted adult teeth, have been choosing to preserve (bank) those stem cells for their personal use in the future. 

Watch the 2-minute video below to learn more about dental stem cell banking:


 

About Simply Smiles:

Dr. Kiara R. Miro-Trujillo
 earned her dental degree from New York University College School of Dentistry. She is a member of the American Dental Association and Florida Dental Association. Her area of interests are Cosmetic Dentistry and Pediatrics. She has two beautiful sons, with whom she enjoys spending her free time. She also serves the community by volunteering in Community Smiles, a non profit dental clinic that provides dental care for families with low income. 
Along with her husband, Alexander, they participate in their local church as missionaries to provide dental care to those in need abroad.

Dr. Alexander D.Trujillo received his Doctor of Dental Surgery degree (DDS) at Universidad Central del Este in Dominican Republic in 1997 and his DDS degree from New York University College of Dentistry in 2004. Dr. Trujillo began his private practice career in June of 2004 and since then has dedicated his practice to complete dental restoration. Dr. Trujillo has been certified by the State of Florida in I.V. Conscious Sedation and has received a certificate in Implant Dentistry. He is a member of the Florida Dental Association, which helps him keep current in all matters related to dentistry. Dr.Trujillo is also an active member of the dental community, participating with local charities providing dental services within state as well as abroad to others in need. He has traveled to Haiti and Guatemala to provide dental care for both adults and children. Dr. Trujillo is an active member of New Life Ministries, a local Christian church. He is the chairman of the church’s Golf tournament committee and is intimately involved with Hands of God ministries, New Life’s missions team. In his spare time he loves to spend time with his lovely wife, Kiara and his four sons. His hobbies include: traveling, exercise, fishing and diving. 

Tags: Company Updates

Advanced Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (AOMS) in Elmhurst, IL Partners with Provia Labs to make Store-A-Tooth™ Dental Stem Cell Banking Available to their Patients.

Posted by Ryan LeClair on Mon, Jun 29, 2015 @ 10:00 AM

Advanced Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery

Together, Advanced Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Provia Laboratories aim to ensure every AOMS patient is informed about Store-A-Tooth and given the choice to preserve their own stem cells for future regenerative medicine.

Littleton, MA (July 29, 2015):
Nearly everyone has heard of the potential of stem cells to treat a wide range of serious diseases. Yet few people realize that a rich source of these cells is teeth—baby teeth that come loose during childhood, wisdom teeth extracted from teens or young adults, and teeth that need to be pulled to make room for braces. These potent stem cells exist in the dental pulp of healthy teeth, and as long as they are collected, transported, processed and stored properly, they can be preserved to protect a family’s future health. 

Provia Laboratories offers a service to do just that and it is called Store-A-Tooth. The Littleton, MA based company manages an FDA Registered, GMP tissue bank preserving stem cells for thousands of families. Only recently has Store-A-Tooth been introduced in the Greater Chicagoland area – part of a national expansion of Provia’s widely popular Store-A-Tooth service.

Advanced Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery in Elmhurst, IL offers a full scope of oral and maxillofacial surgery services including IV anesthesia, dental implants, and dental extractions – including wisdom teeth. They pride themselves on offering kind, compassionate care in a comfortable setting. “AOMS is a perfect partner to work with. They are committed to high quality care and ensuring their patients are well informed of the latest technologies and options,” says Howard Greenman, Chief Executive Officer of Provia Laboratories. He continues, “Most families are unaware of these important cells that would normally be discarded. The Oral Surgery community plays a vital role in helping families make informed decisions before it is too late.”

Advanced Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery will participate in the Store-A-Tooth program by making information about the service available to their patients. Store-A-Tooth is an affordable option for families seeking to make their children’s stem cells available for them in the future. For more information about Store-A-Tooth™ dental stem cell banking, please call 1-877-867-5753, visit us at http://www.store-a-tooth.com ,or ‘Like’ Store-A-Tooth at http://www.facebook.com/storeatooth.

About Provia Laboratories, LLC

Provia Laboratories, LLC (http://www.provialabs.com) is a healthcare company headquartered in Littleton, MA which specializes in high-quality biobanking. Provia offers a variety of products and services for use in complex biobanking environments to improve sample logistics, security, and quality. The company advises industrial, academic, and governmental clients on matters related to the preservation of biological specimens for research and clinical use. Provia’s core business, Store-A-Tooth (http://www.store-a-tooth.com) is a private stem cell bank with nearly 1000 collection sites serving clients from around the world.

Tags: Company Updates

Appell Dental Group Offers Dental Stem Cell Banking

Posted by Ryan LeClair on Mon, Mar 23, 2015 @ 03:38 PM

Appell Dental Group

 

AppellLogo

Store-A-Tooth is proud to announce Appell Dental Group in Arlington Heights, IL as our newest dental partner.

As our dental partner, Appell Dental Group in Arlington Heights, IL will work with Provia Labs, providers of the Store-A-Tooth private stem cell banking service, to educate patients who request to learn more about banking their dental stem cells.

A growing body of medical research is focused on the use of stem cells to heal tissue damaged through injury, disease, aging or congenital defect. Since the discovery of stem cells in dental pulp, patients losing teeth, either baby teeth or extracted adult teeth, have been choosing to preserve (bank) those stem cells for their personal use in the future. 

Watch our two minute video below to learn more about the valuable stem cells in teeth. 

 

Tags: Company Updates

North Shore Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Offers Dental Stem Cell Banking

Posted by Ryan LeClair on Thu, Feb 19, 2015 @ 03:51 PM

NorthShoreCropped resized 600

Store-A-Tooth is proud to announce North Shore Oral and Maxillary Surgery as our newest dental partner.

As our dental partner, North Shore Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery in Buffalo Grove, IL will work with Provia Labs, providers of the Store-A-Tooth private stem cell banking service, to educate patients who request to learn more about banking their dental stem cells.

A growing body of medical research is focused on the use of stem cells to heal tissue damaged through injury, disease, aging or congenital defect. Since the discovery of stem cells in dental pulp, patients losing teeth, either baby teeth or extracted adult teeth, have been choosing to preserve (bank) those stem cells for their personal use in the future. 

Watch our two minute video below to learn more about the valuable stem cells in teeth.


Tags: Company Updates

Born with a windpipe less than a tenth of an inch wide, he was the first child in the world to get a transplant made from a donor organ and his own stem cells.

Posted by Mark Haigh on Fri, Jul 25, 2014 @ 09:44 AM

Ciaran Finn-Lynch, an Irish boy who was born with a windpipe less than a tenth of an inch wide. At age 10, he was the first child in the world to get a transplant made from a donor organ and his own stem cells.

Many of Macchiarini's patients have been given only months or a few years to live, left with no options or any hope.

“You see a patient and this patient has no other alternatives,” Macchiarini said. “And he will die very, very soon. As a human and as a doctor are we allowed to say no? I don’t think so.”

Though it might sound like science fiction, scientists around the world are actively experimenting with this promising science. Recent accomplishments include Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center's announcement that four teenage girls with a rare genetic disorder were implanted with lab-grown vaginas, and at the University of Basel in Switzerland, scientists regrew the nose tissue of older people whose noses had been partially lost to skin cancer.

But while scientists are eagerly working toward being able to grow vital organs like hearts, lungs and kidneys in the lab, it will be years before they are ready to attempt transplanting those in humans.


"As a human and as a doctor are we allowed to say no? I don’t think so."


But Dr. Macchiarini has already taken the science out of the lab. He first made headlines six years ago, in 2008, when he transplanted the world's first lab-made windpipe. It was constructed from a donor trachea that had been stripped of its original cells, leaving it as a skeleton upon which a new trachea could be built with the patient’s own stem cells. The groundbreaking method would allow Macchiarini to bypass two of the major problems associated with donated organs: the risk of rejection and the need to take powerful anti-rejection drugs.

Original article By Linda Caroll

Linda Carroll is a regular contributor to NBC News. She writes about health and science and her work has appeared in The Science Times, Newsday and The Los Angeles Times as well as national magazines including Smart Money and Health. She is coauthor of "The Concussion Crisis: Anatomy of a Silent Epidemic" and the recently released "Duel for the Crown: Affirmed, Alydar, and Racing's Greatest Rivalry." She lives in rural New Jersey.


Tags: Dental Stem Cells, Research, Healthcare, Regenerative Medicine, Stem Cells & Diabetes, Adult Stem Cells

Eventually scientists hope to get to the point where any replacement body part or organ you need would simply be manufactured in a lab, man-made, just for you..

Posted by Mark Haigh on Tue, Jul 22, 2014 @ 12:00 PM

Dr. Paolo Macchiarini of the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden, is pushing the boundaries of the emerging field of regenerative medicine, which could eliminate the need for donor organs, which are in short supply all over the globe.

But for now, there is only one surgeon in the world who is doing transplants in humans with artificially grown organs. Patients come to the controversial surgeon because he is literally their only hope.

Little Hannah Warren. Born without a trachea and unable to breathe on her own, she had spent her entire life in the hospital, kept alive only by a tube. No child with her disorder has ever lived past the age of six, and Dr. Macchiarini's artificial trachea was her only hope.

Original article By Linda Caroll

Linda Carroll is a regular contributor to NBC News. She writes about health and science and her work has appeared in The Science Times, Newsday and The Los Angeles Times as well as national magazines including Smart Money and Health. She is coauthor of "The Concussion Crisis: Anatomy of a Silent Epidemic" and the recently released "Duel for the Crown: Affirmed, Alydar, and Racing's Greatest Rivalry." She lives in rural New Jersey.

 

 



Tags: Research, Healthcare, Regenerative Medicine, Adult Stem Cells

Dr. Paolo Macchiarini of the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden, is pushing the boundaries of the emerging field of regenerative medicine

Posted by Mark Haigh on Fri, Jul 18, 2014 @ 09:48 AM

Dr. Paolo Macchiarini of the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden, is using a patient's own cells to rebuild tissues and organs. Eventually scientists hope to get to the point where any replacement body part or organ you need would simply be manufactured in a lab, man-made, just for you. This could eliminate the need for donor organs, which are in short supply all over the globe.

But for now, there is only one surgeon in the world who is doing transplants in humans with artificially grown organs. Patients come to the controversial surgeon because he is literally their only hope.

Take Julia Tuulik, a Russian dancer whose trachea was destroyed after a car accident.

“They offered for me this one chance,” Tuulik told Meredith Vieira for NBC News’ “A Leap of Faith: A Meredith Vieira Special,” airing Friday at 8 p.m. ET/7 p.m. CT. “And I haven’t other chance in my life.”

Original article By Linda Caroll

Linda Carroll is a regular contributor to NBC News. She writes about health and science and her work has appeared in The Science Times, Newsday and The Los Angeles Times as well as national magazines including Smart Money and Health. She is coauthor of "The Concussion Crisis: Anatomy of a Silent Epidemic" and the recently released "Duel for the Crown: Affirmed, Alydar, and Racing's Greatest Rivalry." She lives in rural New Jersey.

 

 



Tags: Research, Healthcare, Regenerative Medicine, Adult Stem Cells

A new trachea from stem cells and a scaffold

Posted by Mark Haigh on Mon, Jul 14, 2014 @ 01:26 PM

Italian surgeon uses plastic as a scaffold, rather than a donated trachea. The first recipient would be Andermariam Beyene, a 36-year-old engineer from Eritrea.

 

Macchiarini’s team began by collecting stem cells from Beyene’s bone marrow. Those cells were mixed with special growth factors and then poured onto a scaffold made from plastic — in fact, the very same plastic that is used to make soda bottles — which had been made to mimic the shape of a real windpipe.

In just a matter of days, the scaffold began to transform into an actual functioning windpipe.

Macchiarini described the magical sounding process like this: “It’s like if you roast a chicken. It’s the same thing. You fill this box with fluid that includes cells. And then this chicken scaffold just is submerged in this fluid and the cells penetrate inside.”

Eight patients have now received his completely artificial, bio-engineered tracheas, but because the surgery is still highly experimental and unproven, critics worry that he is putting his patients at risk and taking the science out of the lab prematurely.

Skeptics have questioned whether he is using his desperate — and highly vulnerable — patients as human guinea pigs.

“I do believe he’s in the gray zone,” Dr. Joseph Vacanti, surgeon- in-chief at the Massachusetts General Hospital for Children, told Vieira in September of 2013.

Not all of Macchiarini's patients have survived, but supporters argue that this is how surgery advances.


"I do believe he’s in the gray zone."


“Take a look at any major turn in surgery,” said Dr. Rick Pearl, pediatric surgeon-in-chief at Children's Hospital of Illinois in Peoria. “It never started out working, did it?

“Tom Starzl, when he started doing liver transplants, the first seven, eight, nine patients all died. Everybody said he was nuts, OK? Christian Barnard, when he started doing heart transplants, everyone threw rocks at him. This is how we’re going to treat diseases in the future and this is the start of it.”

One of Macchiarini's most promising success stories is Claudia Castillo, a Spanish mother who is doing so well six years after her transplant that an increasing number of Macchiarini's colleagues are beginning to see him in a new light.

“I believe, for the field, we are now at the end of the beginning,” Vacanti said. “And so, he may feel alone, but he is not alone. He’s part of the group that’s making fantasy real.”

Original article By Linda Caroll

Linda Carroll is a regular contributor to NBC News. She writes about health and science and her work has appeared in The Science Times, Newsday and The Los Angeles Times as well as national magazines including Smart Money and Health. She is coauthor of "The Concussion Crisis: Anatomy of a Silent Epidemic" and the recently released "Duel for the Crown: Affirmed, Alydar, and Racing's Greatest Rivalry." She lives in rural New Jersey.

Tags: Research, Healthcare, Regenerative Medicine, Adult Stem Cells

A Leap of Faith: Desperate Patients Look to Lab-Grown Organs

Posted by James Andrews on Tue, Jul 08, 2014 @ 10:38 AM

He is a world-renowned surgeon who has been described both as a daring pioneer and as a cowboy who takes dangerous risks with his patients.

Dr. Paolo Macchiarini of the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden, is pushing the boundaries of the emerging field of regenerative medicine, which involves using a patient's own cells to rebuild tissues and organs. Eventually scientists hope to get to the point where any replacement body part or organ you need would simply be manufactured in a lab, man-made, just for you. This could eliminate the need for donor organs, which are in short supply all over the globe.

But for now, there is only one surgeon in the world who is doing transplants in humans with artificially grown organs. Patients come to the controversial surgeon because he is literally their only hope.

Take Julia Tuulik, a Russian dancer whose trachea was destroyed after a car accident.

“They offered for me this one chance,” Tuulik told Meredith Vieira for NBC News’ “A Leap of Faith: A Meredith Vieira Special,” airing Friday at 8 p.m. ET/7 p.m. CT. “And I haven’t other chance in my life.”

Or little Hannah Warren. Born without a trachea and unable to breathe on her own, she had spent her entire life in the hospital, kept alive only by a tube. No child with her disorder has ever lived past the age of six, and Dr. Macchiarini's artificial trachea was her only hope.

Or Ciaran Finn-Lynch, an Irish boy who was born with a windpipe less than a tenth of an inch wide. At age 10, he was the first child in the world to get a transplant made from a donor organ and his own stem cells.

Many of Macchiarini's patients have been given only months or a few years to live, left with no options or any hope.

“You see a patient and this patient has no other alternatives,” Macchiarini said. “And he will die very, very soon. As a human and as a doctor are we allowed to say no? I don’t think so.”

Though it might sound like science fiction, scientists around the world are actively experimenting with this promising science. Recent accomplishments include Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center's announcement that four teenage girls with a rare genetic disorder were implanted with lab-grown vaginas, and at the University of Basel in Switzerland, scientists regrew the nose tissue of older people whose noses had been partially lost to skin cancer.

But while scientists are eagerly working toward being able to grow vital organs like hearts, lungs and kidneys in the lab, it will be years before they are ready to attempt transplanting those in humans.


"As a human and as a doctor are we allowed to say no? I don’t think so."


But Dr. Macchiarini has already taken the science out of the lab. He first made headlines six years ago, in 2008, when he transplanted the world's first lab-made windpipe. It was constructed from a donor trachea that had been stripped of its original cells, leaving it as a skeleton upon which a new trachea could be built with the patient’s own stem cells. The groundbreaking method would allow Macchiarini to bypass two of the major problems associated with donated organs: the risk of rejection and the need to take powerful anti-rejection drugs.

By 2011, the Italian surgeon had moved on to plastic as a scaffold, rather than a donated trachea. The first recipient would be Andermariam Beyene, a 36-year-old engineer from Eritrea.

 

Macchiarini’s team began by collecting stem cells from Beyene’s bone marrow. Those cells were mixed with special growth factors and then poured onto a scaffold made from plastic — in fact, the very same plastic that is used to make soda bottles — which had been made to mimic the shape of a real windpipe.

In just a matter of days, the scaffold began to transform into an actual functioning windpipe.

Macchiarini described the magical sounding process like this: “It’s like if you roast a chicken. It’s the same thing. You fill this box with fluid that includes cells. And then this chicken scaffold just is submerged in this fluid and the cells penetrate inside.”

Eight patients have now received his completely artificial, bio-engineered tracheas, but because the surgery is still highly experimental and unproven, critics worry that he is putting his patients at risk and taking the science out of the lab prematurely.

Skeptics have questioned whether he is using his desperate — and highly vulnerable — patients as human guinea pigs.

“I do believe he’s in the gray zone,” Dr. Joseph Vacanti, surgeon- in-chief at the Massachusetts General Hospital for Children, told Vieira in September of 2013.

Not all of Macchiarini's patients have survived, but supporters argue that this is how surgery advances.


"I do believe he’s in the gray zone."


“Take a look at any major turn in surgery,” said Dr. Rick Pearl, pediatric surgeon-in-chief at Children's Hospital of Illinois in Peoria. “It never started out working, did it?

“Tom Starzl, when he started doing liver transplants, the first seven, eight, nine patients all died. Everybody said he was nuts, OK? Christian Barnard, when he started doing heart transplants, everyone threw rocks at him. This is how we’re going to treat diseases in the future and this is the start of it.”

One of Macchiarini's most promising success stories is Claudia Castillo, a Spanish mother who is doing so well six years after her transplant that an increasing number of Macchiarini's colleagues are beginning to see him in a new light.

“I believe, for the field, we are now at the end of the beginning,” Vacanti said. “And so, he may feel alone, but he is not alone. He’s part of the group that’s making fantasy real.”

 

Original article By Linda Caroll

Linda Carroll is a regular contributor to NBC News. She writes about health and science and her work has appeared in The Science Times, Newsday and The Los Angeles Times as well as national magazines including Smart Money and Health. She is coauthor of "The Concussion Crisis: Anatomy of a Silent Epidemic" and the recently released "Duel for the Crown: Affirmed, Alydar, and Racing's Greatest Rivalry." She lives in rural New Jersey.


Tags: Dental Stem Cells, Research, Healthcare, Regenerative Medicine, Stem Cells & Diabetes, Adult Stem Cells

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